Top five things to do in the Southern Highlands

By October 15, 20192019 News

Excited for the Bowral Classic?

The original Gran Fondo is back soon but what else can you do when in and around Bowral?

1. Fitzroy Falls

An obvious one this but well worth going over why it is such an amazing sight. Located in Morton National Park, the Falls are only a 20-30 minute drive from Bowral. The falls themselves are stunning and offer sweeping views across pristine national park. But it’s so much more than just the famous waterfall. There are 6km of constructed walking track connecting 15 lookout points. You can even take on the 30km cycling trail!

2. Don Bradman Museum

Before you non-cricket lovers start complaining this is way more than just a sports museum. Sir Donald Bradman may have racked up the highest ever batting average but his legacy transcends statistics. A beacon of hope for people suffering through the Great Depression, ‘The Don’ is widely considered the best ever athlete in any sport. This museum tells the story of the man himself with plenty of interactive areas to interest everyone.

 

3. Kangaroo Valley

About 40 minutes from Bowral lies the stunning Kangaroo Valley. A small town of the same name can be found just after the famous Hampden Bridge, the only timber suspension bridge that still carries cars in Australia! The history doesn’t stop there with Kangaroo Valley home to a variety of heritage-listed buildings that evoke its colonial beginnings. Well worth a trip!

4. Eden Brewery

The official beer supplier for the Bowral Classic and well worth a visit! The Eden Brewery is located in nearby Mittagong and is perfect for a mid-afternoon stop off after a day’s exploring. Quench your thirst with their extensive range of beers and put your feet up!

5. Joadja Ghost Town

One for the explorers. Joadja was once a vibrant mining community but was abandoned by 1911 as oil shale became redundant. Today the site serves as a ghost town with many buildings preserved quite well. It’s also home to the Joadja Distillery which pays homage to the sly grog traditions brought over by Scottish miners in the late 19th century.